Your browser does not support modern web standards, and our site may not appear as it is intended.

Hey folks, as a life long player and someone who works in the gaming industry, I get to play a ton of board games. I thought I’d put together some recommendations for folks who aren’t necessarily hobby gamers and don’t really have the vocabulary or history to make a good choice for something to play with your partner or family while we’re all cooped up. Games are a great way to step away from your screens and interact with your family in a structured format that’s relaxing, challenging, enjoyable and a great distraction from our current predicament.

I’m going to make my recommendations based on a few criteria:

  • Ease of play – I’ll be pointing out games with short learning curves. These games will have you playing in no time!
  • Availability – I’ll be choosing games that you can get at hobby stores, big box outlets and online sellers. This may be a fluctuating scenario though so I’m not going to link to anywhere specific. Support your local hobby store if you can. Otherwise, Target, Walmart, Barnes and Noble, Amazon and other online game outlets can help.
  • Style/Audience – This is a bit subjective, but I’ll be discussing games that I think match the type of games that would fit well with families, roommates, couples, etc, from a variety of themes and game mechanics
  • Price – I’m not going to list specific prices here, but all of these games range from $25-45, roughly. Compared to a movie or a video game, you’ll get a ton of value for your money.
(more…)
Share:
Article || Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Connor
Connor

Hello, readers! If you’re just tuning in, I highly recommend you go back and read part 1 of this article, which can be found HERE.

In part one of The Ethics of Buying Board Games, I discussed a bit of the industry framework and how you, the average game player, probably gets their hands on a game. Next, let’s talk briefly about money. I know many of you have probably already thought part of this through. If the distributors buy the games from the publisher, then the publisher has already gotten their money. Why should it matter where you buy a game from? In theory, that transaction has nothing to do with the publisher, right? I’m glad you asked. We’re getting closer to the heart of the matter here. (more…)

Share:
Article || Tags: , , , ,


Connor
Connor

Purchasing a board game is like any other purchase you make, right? Regardless of where you’re buying a board game or who you’re buying it from, it’s the same product. Finding the lowest price for a game just makes sense. If you can buy the same game for $25 or for $19, why would you choose to pay more?

I’m here to tell you that where you buy your board games does matter, and not just a little. I know in our current era of capitalism, it seems like there’s no way to avoid hurling your hard earned dollars into a vast corporate void. That isn’t true with board games though. In fact, how you buy your board games has a direct impact that can be traced all the way back to the very people who designed and produced that game. More than any other non-local industry I can think of, your money has enormous power – for better or worse. (more…)

Share:
Article || Tags: , , , ,